10.jpg

HR Connection blog

Karina Schultheis

Recent Posts

The Reinvention of HR

on Apr 14, 2021 9:15:00 AM By | Karina Schultheis | 0 Comments | HR HR Department
Even though HR still struggles to dispel its decades-long stereotype as a group of technically incompetent, soft-spoken, corporate enforcers (think of Toby from The Office), in recent years savvy, effective, data-driven HR teams have been actively reimagining everything from performance management to corporate culture. In 2020, COVID-19 and societal unrest made the HR function even more mission-critical and underscored the importance of human intellect in people management. Today, companies are leaning on CHROs and CPOs to lead their pandemic responses and to shape their growth strategies while keeping employees engaged, reconfiguring workflows, redeploying talent, and upskilling staff. Indeed, well-resourced HR teams that successfully managed the transition to a hybrid workplace are now a top competitive advantage for companies in every sector. Just as CFOs' roles were elevated following the 2008 financial crisis, HR's impact and innovative potential will be fully realized in the wake of 2020. Strategic, tactical people advocates will drive tangible business results.   The Shifting Nature and Language of HR When it comes to being both process champions (who work to improve workforce continuity, automating processes, and compliance) and people scientists (who understand, predict, and respond to or change human behavior), no other field comes close to HR. To fully realize its potential, though, HR must change its nature and language. Rather than treat people as "human capital" and focus on "measuring performance," HR leaders must treat people as people and support their overall passions, contributions, and potential. HR must rethink what it means to be "qualified," challenge the status quo, and find ways to be fair and equitable in a world that has neither equal footing nor a one-size-fits-all handbook.   Employees as Primary Stakeholders More than any other factor, employees have the single greatest impact on the success of their organizations. In fact, a 2019 panel of 600 senior executives "attribute[d] 72 percent of their company's value to their employees." 1 As organizations adapt to putting people before profits, it should be overwhelmingly clear that the most important stakeholders in any organization are its people. Rather than treat employees as a resource (that is, as a commodity to manage or to extract value from), today's organizations should put them at the center of their purpose. HR must lead these efforts. As technology continues to automate manual processes, HR has the opportunity—indeed, the obligation—to focus primarily on serving and enabling employees through meaningful strategic initiatives that address their well-being and long-term growth and development. It's time to think differently about employees, their relationships, and their impacts on organizations, and shift the focus to creating the right conditions that allow them to thrive. In a 2020 McKinsey & Company study designed to evaluate employee "well-being and work effectiveness" during COVID-19, "ten employee experience elements accounted for approximately 60 percent of differences in outcomes." 2 The study found that "in addition to basic needs (safety and security), three other experience themes (trusting relationships, social cohesion, and individual purpose) are having a disproportionate impact on employee well-being and work effectiveness." If HR doesn't prioritize enabling these drivers across every level of the organization, who will? And who stands to lose the most if they don't?   The Evolving Role of Technology Thoughtfully applied technology will continue to play an important role as HR functions begin to shift their focus back to their people. Foundational levels of safety and security will remain essential, and employees and leaders alike will continue to expect convenience, speed, and accuracy from HR processes. Many emerging technologies are capitalizing on these changes by offering scalable solutions designed to truly serve employees, such as easing financial strain, improving mental health through charitable giving, or keeping a pulse on employee sentiment so leaders can act on the topics that matter most to their people. Today's employees desire—and deserve—much more out of work than a paycheck. Armed with innovative workplace technologies and a renewed focus on supporting people, HR departments have never been more empowered to shift the employer—employee relationship from a transactional one to a transformational one. The result will be a diverse, engaged, and empowered workforce that's agile, flexible, and responsive to changing business demands.
Read More

The Importance of "Momboarding"

on Mar 10, 2021 9:30:00 AM By | Karina Schultheis | 0 Comments | Retention Onboarding HR Department Mothers
For most women, returning to work after maternity leave is, at the very least, complicated. No matter how much they love their jobs, their bosses, and their colleagues, and no matter how eager they are to return to the professional world, many new mothers feel conflicted about transitioning back to the workplace (and away from being with their new children constantly).
Read More

How Managers Can Strengthen Team Connections During Times of Change

on Apr 29, 2020 9:45:00 AM By | Karina Schultheis | 0 Comments | Employee Engagement Management Trust Team Building
We're living in a time of unprecedented change, but even under more "normal" circumstances, transformation and uncertainty are foundational to business (and life). Whether navigating challenging circumstances like the COVID-19 pandemic or positive ones like unprecedented periods of growth, managers have the ability to proactively strengthen team connections during times of change. Here are some tips to help keep your team engaged, even amid the most turbulent situations. 1. Be open and honest In some situations, leaders may be limited in what they can share, but you should always aim to provide your team with whatever information you can in a timely and professional manner. When things are changing quickly, access to information is comforting and helps to maintain a small sense of control. Fostering open discussions with your team about what's going on, what it might mean for them, and when you expect to have more information will help build trust and strengthen team connections. (Fun fact: Research suggests trust is the single most important thing in an employer-employee relationship.) This also gives you an opportunity to address your team's fears and concerns and build the understanding that "we are all in this together"which is a powerful motivator and cohesion builder. 2. Set clear expectations and responsibilities If anything is changing on your team (structure, responsibilities, strategy, etc.) it's crucial that you address these changes as soon as possible and clearly define roles and expectations. Be sure to include insight and input from your team so that you're setting realistic deadlines and goals. It's also a good idea to be extra-accessible during times of change, so you're available to answer any questions or clarify new projects as they come up. 3. Keep your team involved Remember: You hired your people for a reason. Trust is a two-way street, and in order to be an effective leader you must demonstrate your trust in your team's abilities. Great leaders also know that listening is just as important as communicating and this is particularly true during times of uncertainty and additional stress. When your people feel trusted and relied upon, they are likely to feel motivated and connected. Your ability to make good decisions as a leader also relies upon insight from your team, so ensure you're listening closely to their feedback. 4. Acknowledge your people When your people have been working hard in the face of change, don't forget to show your genuine appreciation. Saying "thank you" in a meaningful way can look like a spot bonus, an afternoon off, a handwritten note or heartfelt email. The key is to genuinely acknowledge their contributions. Your people are your business. Make sure they know that their hard work is being seen and is making a difference.
Read More

Subscribe to the HR Connection blog!

Recent Posts

Topics

see all