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HR Connection blog

How HR Can Support Companies in Times of Crisis

on May 22, 2020 8:45:00 AM By | Jessica Miller-Merrell | 0 Comments | Management HR Department Coronavirus
When economic downturns, natural disasters, company reorganizations, and other challenges arise, companies depend on HR leaders to set policies, initiate support, and assist employees. During the COVID-19 pandemic, HR departments have been actively involved in their companies’ decisions (such as slowing businesses, canceling conferences, and implementing new work arrangements) to slow the spread of the disease and to adjust to statewide and local social-distancing directives. By maintaining several key focus points, HR staff can more effectively lead their companies through this crisis.
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COVID-19 and Discrimination in the Workplace

on Apr 22, 2020 9:45:00 AM By | Steven Alvarado | 0 Comments | Discrimination HR Department Coronavirus
Webster's defines xenophobia as "fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners or of anything that is strange or foreign." The history of pandemic infectious disease outbreaks usually leads to unwarranted attacks on a certain group of people for its origin. Two recent pandemics highlight this issue: H1N1 (or the "Swine Flu") and Ebola. In 2009, a strain of H1N1 influenza resulted in a pandemic. Some of the first cases of H1N1 were discovered at pig farms located in Mexico. As a result, Mexicans, Latin Americans, and others of Latin American decent were stigmatized and blamed for the virus and it spread. However, there was no evidence to suggest that people of Mexican or Latin American descent were the cause or spread of the disease. Additionally, in 2013, the Ebola virus appeared in America when Eric Duncan, a Liberian man, was diagnosed with the virus in Texas. Similar to H1N1 with people of Mexican nationality, xenophobic talk stigmatizing Africans and African-Americans soon spread. Most of these examples highlight the xenophobia that exists in the public during these outbreaks, but you can be certain that the same kind of issues will arise in the workplace. As a result, employers need to be vigilant in protecting their employees from any discrimination, retaliation, or harassment stemming from xenophobic rhetoric from employee to employee or from supervisor to employee. Like H1N1 and Ebola, one group in particular is likely to be scapegoated for COVID-19: people of Asian descent, particularly people of Chinese national origin. There have already been numerous reports of people of Chinese descent being discriminated against, including declining sales in Chinatown districts and attacks against people of Chinese descent in public. Given these reports, employers should take steps to prevent any such similar actions from taking place in the workplace. Almost all employers have general anti-discrimination, retaliation and harassment policies in place. Those policies should make clear that employers–or colleagues for that matter–do not discriminate against employees based on national origin. The CDC recently warned: "DO NOT show prejudice to people of Asian descent, because of fear of this new virus. Do not assume that someone of Asian descent is more likely to have COVID-19." There are two areas of concern employers should focus on in this analysis: (1) How do I make sure I'm treating all my employees the same regardless of national origin? and (2) How do I make sure my employees aren't discriminating/harassing my employees of Asian descent? To address the first question, employers should ensure that they do not base a decision to bar or remove an employee from the workplace based on national origin or ethnicity. These decisions are looked at objectively compared to the rest of the workforce. Does it appear the employer is only quarantining employees of Asian descent? What is the mix of employees that have been sent home from the workplace? The employer needs to base these decisions on the facts present at the time the decision was made. There is an appropriate way to approach concerns over the virus. For instance, an employer will likely be able to show a non-discriminatory reason for sending the employee home if the employee had recently visited China or another highly affected area, or the employer can objectively document the employees were exhibiting flu-like symptoms. In short, make sure you treat all your employees the same, based on the objective evidence at your disposal at the time of the decision. Employers should rely on the resources provided by the CDC, WHO or OSHA, as well as the state agencies in effect in their jurisdiction to help make decisions. As to the second question, employers will need to be especially diligent and closely monitor any concerns by employees of Asian descent in their workforce. One of the best ways to get in front of this issue is to provide your employees with information and training. Explain to your employees the concerns with COVID-19, the best ways to minimize exposure, and that no nationality is more likely to spread the virus than another. Furthermore, employers should continue to enforce their harassment policy and investigate claims made by any employees of discrimination or harassment based on national origin and take appropriate disciplinary steps against any employees found to be in violation of the policy. The policies an employer puts forward are only as effective as the people put in charge to enforce them and that starts from the top down. It is important to make sure your supervisory employees are leading by example in this area.
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How to Keep Your Top Talent From Walking Out the Door

on Dec 26, 2019 9:45:00 AM By | Silver Rose | 0 Comments | talent Turnover HR Department
To learn more, please join us on Tuesday January 21st at 1:00 EST (10:00 PST) for a Live Webinar with Silver Rose (How to Keep Your Top Talent From Walking Out the Door) This webinar is valid for 1 PDC toward SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP recertification and has been pre-approved by HRCI for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hour. Click here to learn more.
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Protected Activity or Terminable Misconduct?

on Nov 27, 2019 10:15:00 AM By | Connie Bertram | 0 Comments | termination HR Department Protections whistleblower
It has become almost routine for employees pursuing whistleblower and other employment-related claims against their employer to engage in "self-help discovery," using their access to files and databases to collect and gather, in violation of company policy, documents and data relating to their claims. The company often becomes aware of this type of misconduct during internal investigations, when a forensic review of the complainant's computer or statements by witnesses reveal that the complainant has collected or is collecting evidence. Or, the misconduct may not become evident until after the employee has filed a charge or a lawsuit, when confidential company documents are referenced in the charge or complaint or the employer undertakes discovery.
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Employee Benefits: Make Them Easy to Buy and Use

on Nov 20, 2019 9:45:00 AM By | Sharlyn Lauby | 0 Comments | Education Benefits HR Department
One of my favorite phrases is “make it easy to buy and easy to use”. I learned it years ago in the hospitality industry. If you want to upsell a restaurant guest, make it easy for them to buy the premium product and use it. Basically, as the guest, I simply want to pay and enjoy.
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6 Unconventional Skills to Develop for Future Professional Success

on Aug 21, 2019 2:03:00 PM By | Sharlyn Lauby | 0 Comments | Soft Skills Management HR Department
We spend a lot of time talking about what organizations need to do in order to be successful: things like candidate experience, employee experience, company culture, etc. One of the prerequisites of developing a world-class organization is having a human resources department that can partner with the business to make it happen. I hate to say it, but a mediocre HR team may or may not have the bandwidth to build a best place to work.
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The Reverse Performance Review

on Aug 9, 2019 9:49:00 AM By | Jeff Miller, Ph.D. | 0 Comments | Performance Review Management HR Department
When asked about the best jobs they've ever had, most people will say that their best jobs were the ones for which they had the best managers. “Most people” isn’t merely anecdotal, though: that claim is backed up by plenty of data. For example, Gallup research finds that “managers account for at least 70% of the variance in employee engagement scores across business units,” and half of the workers surveyed “have left their job to get away from their manager at some point in their career.”
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