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HR Connection blog

How to Make Diversity in Hiring a Reality

on Jun 23, 2021 10:00:00 AM By | Linda Brenner | 0 Comments | Diversity hiring Inclusion
In their quest to achieve better hiring and retention results, organizations see improving the speed and quality of hiring as a corporate imperative and are often ready to make significant changes to win the talent they need. This desire for improved results is not new, though: organizations have wanted to hire faster and better for a long time (often targeting skills that are in scarce supply). But they have struggled to do so well and consistently. What's new and different today is the fact that organizations are now genuinely interested in increasing the number of people of color—specifically Black talent—in leadership positions. The impetus for this shift was of course the murder of George Floyd, along with the subsequent high-profile Black Lives Matter awareness campaigns and marches world wide against systemic racism. Companies can no longer ignore the data: Corporate America has a shockingly low number of Black leaders. (For example, Black CEOs lead fewer than 1 percent of Fortune 500 companies. 1) Workplace diversity leads to improvements in enterprise value, innovation, and global economic outcomes. 2 Most workplace diversity initiatives fail to achieve their goals. 3 The confluence of these factors has inspired some organizations' senior leaders to work harder than ever to make measurable and sustained improvements to the diversity of their workforces. Other organizations, however, don't understand—or are unwilling to acknowledge—the work required to win and retain top Black talent, and instead are satisfied with simply moving a few Black people into high-visibility jobs. Unfortunately, poor employment practices negatively affect Black employees more than their White counterparts. For example, when people are hired or promoted into leadership positions prematurely or inappropriately, they face far less criticism and pushback when they are White than when they are Black. Unlike White leaders in that situation, Black leaders have to deal with racism-based complaints ("See what happens when we put a Black person in a position like this?") and sabotage ("They got hired over all these other people, so let them figure out how things work around here"), all of which harms not only them but also the overall workforce and the business. Proper recruitment, selection, onboarding, and performance management routines are critical for the success of any new executive. This holds particularly true when companies seek to make their leadership ranks more diverse. The old routines that may have worked reasonably well with primarily White leaders must be examined and adapted to successfully and consistently win top, diverse talent. It's time for companies to implement new strategies. Conduct a diversity audit of the company's recent and current workforces. Analyze at least two years of hiring, internal movement, and attrition data by level, job type, geography, business unit, compensation, ethnicity, gender, age, and other relevant factors What is the status of attrition, retention, and retirement of the current workforce? What positions and skills are hard to find and retain—and why? What are the organization's trends related to diversity hiring, mobility, and retention? What are the priority and specificity of diversity needs by business unit, location, level, etc.? Determine workforce needs for the near future. Key questions to answer include: What is the optimal workforce profile (in terms of size, shape, mix, diversity, and capabilities) for the organization today compared to what it will need during the next two to three years? What will the workforce require to meet the organization's business objectives now and during the next two to three years? What emerging technology and skills are critical to ensure business success and competitive advantage today and during the next two to three years? Identify priority areas for workforce diversity. Before using the future needs analysis to determine the priority areas for diversity hiring, first define what diversity means with regard to job type, location, etc. Does this mean women? Black people? Any person of color? Clarity on this issue is key to moving diversity hiring and retention outcomes forward. Assess the organization's current ability to win passive talent. Because the competition for top talent remains fierce, any company that wants to hire more high-performing diverse employees needs to examine how it measures up in the following areas: Prioritized, specific, measurable sourcing plans based on business demands Broad research on industry competition for talent A consistent and well-documented methodology for identifying, connecting with, and tracking high-performing passive talent Developing talent pipelines and engagement levels over time for key roles Working with hiring managers to successfully attract passive talent to consider the organization Success in winning top passive talent that stays and performs well over time Assess the organization's current ability to effectively onboard and retain talent. Because companies need to not only hire diverse talent but also ensure that it stays and performs well over time, they must assess their onboarding and retention practices. The data obtained by the initial diversity analysis will indicate where (in terms of geography, roles, levels, etc.) in the organization diversity hiring is succeeding and where it is failing. With this information, the company can answer the following questions: Is there a structured and documented approach to onboarding that clearly defines roles, responsibilities, and measures of success? Is there survey data from new hires that indicate the effectiveness of the onboarding experience? Is the company successful at integrating new hires and helping them to become acclimated and productive quickly? Do managers get personally involved in the orientation, assimilation, and development of their team members? (And are they held accountable for doing so?) Are these activities a stated investment priority for the organization? The need for new approaches to achieve workplace diversity is clear. By taking bold steps to retool their hiring practices, organizations can make the shift from merely wanting to hire diverse talent to actually doing it.
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Education's 2021 Flash Hiring Boom

on Mar 15, 2021 10:13:35 AM By | Employment Enterprises | 0 Comments | Education hiring Recruitment
A Look at the Specialists and Recruiting Push behind the Return to Full-time School The Coronavirus Pandemic has taught the world many lessons, including how essential in-person K-12 schooling is to the healthy functioning of the U.S. economy and workforce. As Axios reported this February, economists predict that the past year will deliver a $14 to $28 trillion long-term blow to the economy “due to coronavirus-induced learning loss.” The need for childcare and remote schooling support at home has forced millions of parents out of the labor force and become a hot-button issue for every state government and school board across the country.
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How to Build an Effective Employee Welcome Package

on Feb 28, 2020 9:45:00 AM By | Danielle Freedland | 0 Comments | Onboarding hiring Welcome
Up to 20 percent of employee turnover occurs within the first 45 days an employee joins a new company. The $3,000 to $43,000 price tag for each such departure makes onboarding an essential aspect of HR service and a significant influence on employee engagement and retention. Creating a welcome package for new hires is one way to reduce turnover by helping new hires feel excited about joining the company and calming their nerves by providing clear expectations, outcomes, and goals for their first day. A well-thought-out welcome package can leave a lasting impression and empower new employees in their roles.
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Internet Job Postings Pose Legal Perils for Employers

on Feb 5, 2020 9:30:00 AM By | Tory Summey | 0 Comments | Legal hiring Job Posting
Today, social media platforms, including Facebook and LinkedIn, allow employers to target their job listings based on various characteristics of the users they wish to reach. As a result, employers can theoretically identify better candidates while expending fewer resources. However, these ad platforms have drawn the ire of certain plaintiffs’ law firms and, more recently, the EEOC. 
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Hiring Practices in a Candidate Driven Market

on Oct 23, 2019 9:45:00 AM By | Strategic Human Resources, Inc. | 0 Comments | hiring Candidate Experience
Since the Great Recession in 2008 and especially over the last several years, the economy has moved from recovery mode to consistently maintaining strong growth.  The latest news release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the national monthly unemployment rates have been remaining steady at 3.7%, while at the same time, job numbers continue to stay positive.  Many financial experts see that trend continuing for the foreseeable future.
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Considerations for Rehiring Employees

on Jul 31, 2019 10:40:00 AM By | Heather Kaiser, JD | 0 Comments | Legal hiring Management
Whether it’s a response to the tight employment market or seasonal employment rehiring, former employees are becoming more common. Rehiring employees can be beneficial to your organization, especially if they were strong contributors. You could save time and money since they are familiar with your business, and you do not need to provide them with the in-depth training required for onboarding new employees. A former employee also might have worked elsewhere since leaving your organization, which can be an opportunity to bring new skills, knowledge, and fresh ideas to your workplace.
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4 Tips to Speed Up Your Hiring Process

on Mar 6, 2019 10:51:00 AM By | Sarah Perlman | 0 Comments | Recruiting Benefits Interviews hiring
Candidates have the upper hand in today's job market. Unemployment under four percent means that there is a high quantity of jobs available but a lack of candidates who have the required skills. Great candidates are harder to find which increases the length of the hiring process Managers spend valuable time reviewing resumes and holding interviews—if the candidates even show up that is.
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Tackling the Challenges of Low Unemployment

on Feb 13, 2019 10:07:00 AM By | Carol Anderson | 0 Comments | Unemployment hiring Strategic
The unemployment rate recently hit its lowest point since 1969, dipping to 3.7%. While that's great news for candidates, it might stir a little bit of fear in the hearts of HR professionals.
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Benefits and Risks of Using Social Media Data When Hiring

on Dec 11, 2018 11:59:51 AM By | Tony Restell | 0 Comments | Social Media hiring Social Index
  The meteoric rise of social media has created new opportunities and challenges in the workplace, affecting each and every department in different ways. The recruiting and HR departments are no exception, with businesses of all sizes increasingly looking to access candidates' social media profiles when shortlisting. Social Media Candidate Vetting However, with great power comes great responsibility and recruiters need to strike a fine balance in deciding how deep to go when tapping into social media data. To get a thorough understanding of this dilemma, I spoke to Fiona McLean, CEO of The Social Index. With a background in both corporate hiring and HR, McLean is in the perfect position to shed light on the benefits and risks associated with social media profiling. WHY TAPPING INTO SOCIAL MEDIA PROFILES MAKES SENSE McLean highlighted three key areas in which social media profiling can add value to the recruitment process: First, using social media data to refine the information on file about a candidate enables recruiters to draw up a stronger short-list. They can also more accurately assess whether a particular candidate will be a good cultural fit or not. As covered in previous TalentCulture blog posts, creating a strong company culture is now a big concern for businesses of all sizes. Social media can be a powerful tool in matching talented employees with the compatible workplaces they are looking for. Second, a candidate's social media footprint can indicate how extensive their professional network is, as well as how engaged they are with their contacts. Although this is especially relevant in roles such as business development, being able to leverage employee connections can be valuable in many different organizations and roles. Third, social media activity can also provide invaluable information about how a candidate deals with certain situations. For example, recruiters may seek to assess how they are likely to react during conflict or how empathetic they can be. This is potentially a valuable source of insight when assessing somebody's suitability for a customer service role, for example. THE DANGERS OF DISCRIMINATION AND INCONSISTENCY While the above points illustrate some of the many benefits of mining social media profiles during the recruitment process, McLean was eager to point out that there were also potential downsides. One of the main issues of contention with social media research is where we draw the line when it comes to collecting data. It can be difficult to judge which data is relevant to a candidate's prospective role and occupation and which is not. Getting this wrong can have serious implications. For example, if a candidate has reason to believe that they have been denied an opportunity due to their ethnic background, religious beliefs or political ideologies then there is a real risk of a company being on the wrong end of a discrimination claim. Another potential problem when looking at candidates' social media profiles is ensuring consistency. Some people are more active and public than others in the social sphere, making it difficult to agree on a consistent and sufficient set of data to use when assessing suitability. A tried and tested methodology for assessment is needed to ensure a level playing field. There is also the important issue of consent. How do recruiters communicate their social media research process and ensure that candidates are comfortable with that? SETTING PARAMETERS WITH SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH According to McLean, recruiters should be actively looking to utilize social media research while minimizing the pitfalls highlighted above. Companies already communicate the various stages of their recruitment process (e.g. interviews, selection criteria, assessments, etc.) and social media research can be incorporated into this. This should be clearly tied to the specific requirements of the business and job role to help put candidates at ease and secure consent. Using a third party which specializes in collating and presenting relevant social media data for recruiters will also help to alleviate fears over potential bias and discrimination. The upsides of using social media profiling in hiring suitable candidates are just too important for it to be left out of the recruitment process. Balancing social data collection with respect for boundaries and applying this research in a clear and consistent manner is a task all recruiters need to be engaged in.
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Benefits and Risks of Using Social Media Data When Hiring

on Oct 4, 2018 3:57:41 PM By | Tony Restell | 0 Comments | Human Resources Social Media hiring
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